MoonPoint Support Logo

 


Shop Amazon Warehouse Deals - Deep Discounts on Open-box and Used ProductsAmazon Warehouse Deals



Advanced Search
February
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
     
24
       
2006
Months
Feb


Fri, Feb 24, 2006 6:37 pm

Fuser

You can use the fuser command on Unix or Linux systems to determine if any process has a file open or determine the specific process that has the file open. The fuser program is usually locate in /sbin, so you will need to spcificy /sbin/fuser if it isn't in your path.

The output of the command may differ somewhat depending on the operating system you are running. I've found that on a Solaris 7, Solaris 10, and SGI IRIX64 system that a command like fuser somefile.txt will return the filename followed by a colon and then the process ID (PID) of the process that has the file open with a letter code indicating how the file is being used. The letter code will be an "o", if the process is using the file as an open file. Fuser will still return the filename followed by a colon even if no process has the file open.

fuser somefile.txt
somefile.txt

However, on a Linux system, specifically a Redhat Linux 9 system, nothing is returned, if no process has the file open. You have to use a "-a" option if you want the same response as on the Unix systems mentioned above. If you use the "-a" option, you will see the filename followed by a colon and nothing else, but then you will also see "no process references; use -v for the complete list" on a line below.

$ /sbin/fuser -a somefile.txt
somefile.txt:
No process references; use -v for the complete list

I also don't see a letter code appended to the end of the PID when I run fuser on a Linux system and some process has the file open.

If you run fuser from a regular user account, you may get an indication that no process has a file open when a process owned by another account has the file open. E.g. I know that the /var/log/maillog file is open, but checking it with fuser from a user account doesn't show that the file is open. But, if I rerun fuser from the root account, I do see which PID has the process open and can issue a ps -p command followed by that PID to see the name of the process that has the file open.


$ /sbin/fuser /var/log/maillog
$ /sbin/fuser -a /var/log/maillog
/var/log/maillog:
No process references; use -v for the complete list
$ su - root
Password:
# fuser /var/log/maillog
/var/log/maillog:     2599
# ps -p 2599
  PID TTY          TIME CMD
 2599 ?        00:00:14 syslogd

You can kill a process that has a file open with the "-k" option, e.g. fuser -k somefile.txt

[/os/unix/commands] permanent link

Once You Know, You Newegg AliExpress by Alibaba.com

Shop Amazon Local - Subscribe to Deals in Your Neighborhood

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional

Privacy Policy   Contact

Blosxom logo