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2010
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Thu, Feb 11, 2010 10:24 pm

WPKG Package Settings File

I had an error in a package file that I used for installing Debugging Tools for Windows with WPKG. When I created windbg.xml, I copied an already installed package's xml file to the windbg.xml. I forgot to change the uninstall condition to match what it should be for Debugging Tools for Windows, however. I had the following in windbg.xml:

<check type="uninstall" condition="exists" path="Vim 7.2.320"/>

As a result, when I tried using WPKG to uninstall and reinstall the software, I was unable to do so. To fix the problem, I edited C:\Windows\system32\wpkg.xml and changed that line in the file to the correct uninstall condition, which is the following:

<check type="uninstall" condition="exists" path="Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)"/>

The corrected windbg.xml file contains the following:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<packages>

<!-- Debugging Tools for Windows 32-bit Version -->
<!-- Source: http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/installx86.mspx#a  -->

<package id="WinDbg" name="Debugging Tools for Windows" revision="1" reboot="false" priority="0">
      
  <check type="uninstall" condition="exists" path="Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)" />
 	
  <install cmd='msiexec INSTDIR="C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\" /i %SOFTWARE%\Utilities\SysMgmt\dbg_x86_6.11.1.404.msi  /q' />
  <upgrade cmd='%SOFTWARE%\Utilities\SysMgmt\dbg_x86_6.11.1.404.msi  /q' />
  <remove cmd='msiexec /x {300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD} /q' />

</package>
	
</packages>

References:

  1. Unattended Install for Debugging Tools for Windows
    MoonPoint Support

[/os/windows/software/wpkg] permanent link

Thu, Feb 11, 2010 6:02 pm

Troubleshooting with openssl

You can use the command openssl s_client -connect xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:yyyyy command, where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address of the server and yyyyy is the port number on the server used for HTTPS. The port is usually 443, but does not have to be that port. You can, of course, also use a fully qualified domain name (FQDN), such as paypal.com, instead of an IP address.

By using the command, one can determine if a system is responding correctly using the HTTPS protocol. E.g. below is an example of a query issued against paypal.com:

$ openssl s_client -connect paypal.com:443
CONNECTED(00000003)
depth=2 /C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=Class 3 Public Primary Certification Authority - G2/OU=(c) 1998 VeriSign, Inc. - For authorized use only/OU=VeriSign Trust Network
verify return:1
depth=1 /C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=VeriSign Trust Network/OU=Terms of use at https://www.verisign.com/rpa (c)09/CN=VeriSign Class 3 Secure Server CA - G2
verify return:1
depth=0 /C=US/ST=California/L=San Jose/O=PayPal, Inc./OU=Information Systems/CN=paypal.com
verify return:1
---
Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=US/ST=California/L=San Jose/O=PayPal, Inc./OU=Information Systems/CN=paypal.com
   i:/C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=VeriSign Trust Network/OU=Terms of use at https://www.verisign.com/rpa (c)09/CN=VeriSign Class 3 Secure Server CA - G2
 1 s:/C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=VeriSign Trust Network/OU=Terms of use at https://www.verisign.com/rpa (c)09/CN=VeriSign Class 3 Secure Server CA - G2
   i:/C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=Class 3 Public Primary Certification Authority - G2/OU=(c) 1998 VeriSign, Inc. - For authorized use only/OU=VeriSign Trust Network
---
Server certificate
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----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-----END CERTIFICATE-----
subject=/C=US/ST=California/L=San Jose/O=PayPal, Inc./OU=Information Systems/CN=paypal.com
issuer=/C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=VeriSign Trust Network/OU=Terms of use at https://www.verisign.com/rpa (c)09/CN=VeriSign Class 3 Secure Server CA - G2
---
No client certificate CA names sent
---
SSL handshake has read 3029 bytes and written 308 bytes
---
New, TLSv1/SSLv3, Cipher is DES-CBC3-SHA
Server public key is 1024 bit
Compression: NONE
Expansion: NONE
SSL-Session:
    Protocol  : TLSv1
    Cipher    : DES-CBC3-SHA
    Session-ID: E24FE41E08BCBB5246EE5EAC08E7E4ACBB4708F0CD0089E9EF602E4F3C435922
    Session-ID-ctx:
    Master-Key: FFF8BF97F79796457EE44860212C5F887FFE8F62F4A6FC908DB1A382489BE5C2963C2D5F84BC526911FA5EB096634603
    Key-Arg   : None
    Krb5 Principal: None
    Start Time: 1262641575
    Timeout   : 300 (sec)
    Verify return code: 0 (ok)
---

You can check the expiration date of an SSL certificate by first retrieving the certificate using commands such as in the first line below. You can then check the expiration date with a command such as the one on the next line, which shows that the current certificate for PayPal expires at midnight Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) on June 11, 2010.

$ echo "" | openssl s_client -connect paypal.com:443 > certificate
depth=2 /C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=Class 3 Public Primary Certification Authority
 - G2/OU=(c) 1998 VeriSign, Inc. - For authorized use only/OU=VeriSign Trust Net
work
verify return:1
depth=1 /C=US/O=VeriSign, Inc./OU=VeriSign Trust Network/OU=Terms of use at https://www.verisign.com/rpa (c)09/CN=VeriSign Class 3 Secure Server CA - G2
verify return:1
depth=0 /C=US/ST=California/L=San Jose/O=PayPal, Inc./OU=Information Systems/CN=paypal.com
verify return:1
DONE
$ openssl x509 -in certificate -noout -enddate
notAfter=Jun 11 23:59:59 2010 GMT

Another example below shows the results returned for a self-signed certificate:

# echo "" | /usr/local/ssl/bin/openssl s_client -connect 10.10.0.108:443 > certi
ficate
depth=0 /C=EU/ST=SomeState/L=SomeCity/O=SomeOranization/OU=SomeOrganizationUnit/
CN=localhost
verify error:num=18:self signed certificate
verify return:1
depth=0 /C=EU/ST=SomeState/L=SomeCity/O=SomeOranization/OU=SomeOrganizationUnit/
CN=localhost
verify return:1
DONE
# /usr/local/ssl/bin/openssl x509 -in certificate -noout -enddate
notAfter=Feb 12 11:44:04 2018 GMT

References:

  1. OpenSSL: Documents, s_client(1)
    OpenSSL: The Open Source toolkit for SLS/TLS
  2. When does my certificate expire?
    barndonhutchinson.com -- Linux, Solaris, and general UNIX notes.

[/security/encryption/openssl] permanent link

Thu, Feb 11, 2010 5:53 pm

Unattended Install for Debugging Tools for Windows

I wanted to install Debugging Tools for Windows on several systems. I wanted to do an "unattended", aka "silent", installation where the installation would occur automatically without any user intervention, except perhaps at most a command being issued at a command prompt. The Debugging Tools for Windows comes as an .msi file, which is a Microsoft Windows installation file.

At Forcing MSI Installation Into a Specific Directory, I found a suggestion to put TARGETDIR on the command line when using the msiexec command. E.g. to specify the directory where an application should be installed when the installation file for that application is an .msi file, the author of that page suggested that you can use a command similar to the following:

msiexec TARGETDIR="C:\MyTargetDirectory" /i MyProject.msi

You can use the /q option to specify that the installation does not present a GUI installer window or prompt the user - see Command-Line Options for other command line options.

That did not work in this case, however. So, I decided to try the webpage author's suggestion to turn on logging during an installation of the software where I performed the install normally from the GUI installation method. I turned on verbose logging using the command msiexec /i dbg_x86_6.11.1.404.msi /l*v c:\windbg.log, which created a log file c:\windbg.log.

During the installation process, I chose a "custom" install and specified the installation directory be C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\ rather than the default installation directory of C:\Program Files\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\. When the installation was completed, I saw the following when I opened the log file with Notepad:

MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:12:281]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying INSTDIR property. Its current value is 'C:\Program Files\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\'. Its new value: 'C:\'.
MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:13:291]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying INSTDIR property. Its current value is 'C:\'. Its new value: 'C:\Program Files\'.
MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:16:866]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying INSTDIR property. Its current value is 'C:\Program Files\'. Its new value: 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\'.
MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:18:062]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying INSTDIR property. Its current value is 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\'. Its new value: 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\'.
MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:24:941]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying INSTDIR property. Its current value is 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\'. Its new value: 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\'.
MSI (c) (44:D8) [16:44:25:095]: PROPERTY CHANGE: Modifying _1394 property. Its current value is 'C:\Program Files\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\1394\'. Its new value: 'C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\1394\'.

I could see that the property being modified was INSTDIR rather than TARGETDIR, so I then tried the following command at the command line:

msiexec INSTDIR="C:\Program Files\Utilities\SysMgmt\Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)\" /i dbg_x86_6.11.1.404.msi /q

That put the software in the directory where I wanted it installed and did not display a GUI window or any prompts.

To uninstall software installed through an MSI file, you can use msiexec /x Package|ProductCode. In this case, after the installation, I ran regedit and checked the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall. I could see that the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\{300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD} registry key was the appropriate one, since within it I saw the following:

NameTypeSize
DisplayNameREG_SZ Debugging Tools for Windows (x86)
DisplayVersionREG_SZ 6.11.1.404
UninstallStringREG_EXPAND_SZ MsiExec.exe /I{300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD}

That told me that the ProductCode for Debugging Tools for Windows is {300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD}. However, if I used MsiExec.exe /I{300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD} to uninstall the software, I would get a GUI uninstall window where I would have to select the "remove" option. For a silent uninstall from the command line, I can use msiexec /x {300A2961-B2B5-4889-9CB9-5C2A570D08AD} /q. The /x option indicates that you want to remove the software. The /q option indicates you want a silent uninstall. Without the /q option, you would be prompted to confirm the removal of the software.

The DisplayName registry entry is what you will see under "Uninstall or change a program" or "Add or Remove Programs" under the Windows Control Panel. E.g., in this case, I would see Debugging Tools for Windows (x86) there.

References:

  1. Debugging Tools for Windows
    WHDC - Windows Hardware Developer Central
  2. File Extension .MSI Details
    FILExt - The File Extension Source
  3. Windows Installer
    Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  4. Forcing MSI Installation Into a Specific Directory
    Arthur Zubarev
  5. Command-Line Options
    MSDN: Microsoft Development, MSDN Subscriptions, Resources, and More
  6. Unattended/Silent Installation Switches for Windows Apps
    Unattended, A Windows deployment system

[/os/windows/utilities/sysmgmt] permanent link

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