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Tue, Dec 12, 2017 11:25 pm

NetworkManager and nm-tool

If you wish to check the speed of network interfaces on a CentOS Linux system, if the nm-tool utility, is installed, then you can use it to determine the speed of the network ports.

$ nm-tool

NetworkManager Tool

State: disconnected

- Device: em1 ------------------------------------------------------------------
  Type:              Wired
  Driver:            bnx2
  State:             unmanaged
  Default:           no
  HW Address:        D4:AE:52:CD:0A:D4

  Capabilities:
    Carrier Detect:  yes
    Speed:           1000 Mb/s

  Wired Properties
    Carrier:         on


- Device: em2 ------------------------------------------------------------------
  Type:              Wired
  Driver:            bnx2
  State:             unmanaged
  Default:           no
  HW Address:        D4:AE:52:CD:0A:D5

  Capabilities:
    Carrier Detect:  yes

  Wired Properties
    Carrier:         off


$

If it is installed, the nm-tool program will likely be in /usr/bin . It is part of the NetworkManager package.

[ More Info ]

[/os/unix/linux/centos] permanent link

Sun, Dec 10, 2017 7:39 pm

Determining the version of CentOS on a system

If you are logged into a CentOS Linux system, there are a few ways you can determine the version of CentOS running on the system from a command-line interface (CLI), i.e., a shell prompt.

In the /etc directory, there should be a /etc/centos-release file containing information on the version of CentOS.

$ ls -l /etc/*elease
-rw-r--r--  1 root root  27 Mar 28  2017 /etc/centos-release
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 152 Nov 25  2013 /etc/lsb-release
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root  14 Apr 20  2017 /etc/redhat-release -> centos-release
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root  14 Apr 20  2017 /etc/system-release -> centos-release
$ cat /etc/*elease
CentOS release 6.9 (Final)
LSB_VERSION=base-4.0-amd64:base-4.0-noarch:core-4.0-amd64:core-4.0-noarch:graphi
cs-4.0-amd64:graphics-4.0-noarch:printing-4.0-amd64:printing-4.0-noarch
CentOS release 6.9 (Final)
CentOS release 6.9 (Final)
$

To just see the version number, you can use one of the grep commands below.

$ grep -oE '[0-9]+\.[0-9]+' /etc/redhat-release
6.9
$ grep -oE '[0-9]+\.[0-9]+' /etc/centos-release
6.9
$

[ More Info ]

[/os/unix/linux/centos] permanent link

Tue, Dec 05, 2017 10:53 pm

Determining if a site has implemented HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS)

HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) is a security mechanism used by some websites to ensure that HTTP Secure (HTTPS) is always used by visitors to the site even should some intermediate system between the visitor's browser and the website attempt a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack to downgrade the communications protocol to the unencrypted Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). The HSTS specification was published as Request for Comments (RFC) 6797 on November 19, 2012. You can tell whether a site has implemented HSTS by establishing a telnet connection to port 80, the well-known port for HTTP connections. E.g.:

$ telnet graa.gsfc.nasa.gov 80
Trying 129.164.141.50...
Connected to gewa.gsfc.nasa.gov.
Escape character is '^]'.
HEAD / HTTP/1.1
HOST: example.com

HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently
Date: Wed, 06 Dec 2017 02:56:57 GMT
Server: Apache
X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN
Strict-Transport-Security: max-age=31536000; includeSubDomains
Location: https://example.com/
Connection: close
Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1

Connection closed by foreign host.
$

[ More Info ]

[/network/web] permanent link

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