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Sun, Mar 31, 2024 8:11 pm

Configuring PuTTY for X forwarding

The X Window System, aka X11 or simply X, provides a mechanism that allows you to have the graphical user interface (GUI) for an application running on a remote system to be displayed on the system on which you are running X server software. For systems running a Microsoft Windows operating system, you can use the free PuTTY program to establish a Secure Shell (SSH) connection to an SSH server and configure PuTTY to allow X forwarding so that you can run programs on the SSH server, but have their GUI displayed on the Microsoft Windows system on which you are running PuTTY.

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[/os/windows/network/ssh/putty] permanent link

Sat, Mar 02, 2024 9:01 pm

Location for PuTTY Tunnel Information

PuTTY stores information about sessions you have created to connect to a particular host in the Windows Registry at HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\SimonTatham\PuTTY\Sessions. If you want to view the SSH tunnels configured for a particular host, i.e., the port forwarding settings for that host, you can navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\SimonTatham\PuTTY\Sessions\SessionName\PortForwardings where SessionName is the name you have given to the session associated with the host. E.g., suppose you regularly establish an SSH connection to www.example.com and have named a session for that site MySite. You could navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\SimonTatham\PuTTY\Sessions\MySite\PortForwardings to find the port forwardings settings. If you had named the session My Site, there would be a %20 in the session name stored in the registry as %20 is an HTML representation for the space character. You can doubleclick on the PortForwardings key in the right pane of the registry window to see the values stored in the key. You might see something like the following:

L22011=192.168.0.11:22,L33018=192.168.0.18:33018

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[/os/windows/network/ssh/putty] permanent link

Sun, Jan 21, 2018 10:56 pm

OpenVPN

OpenVPN is free and open-source software that provides Virtual Private Network (VPN) connectivity that is available for a variety of operating systems. To use the software on a Microsoft Windows 10 system, download the the installer for Windows Vista and later from the OpenVPN Community Downloads page; get the OpenVPN community software not the PrivateTunnel software from the OpenVPN project - I mistakenly downloaded and installed PrivateTunnel when I first went to the OpenVPN site and then had to uninstall PrivateTunnel.

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[/os/windows/network/vpn] permanent link

Mon, Jan 15, 2018 7:37 pm

Using the Windows Resource Monitor to monitor network activity

If you want to see the IP addresses to which a program on a Microsoft Windows system is establishing connections, you can use the Resource Monitor utility that is provided with Windows Vista and later versions of Windows to check on network connections from a particular application on the system. To start the program, you can click on the Windows Start button and type resmon or resmon.exe in the "Search programs and files" field on a Windows 7 system or the "Type here to search" field on a Windows 10 system. You should see the resmon utility returned as the best match.

When the Resource Monitor program is running, you can click on the Network tab and then TCP Connections to see network activity associated with programs currently running on the system . You can click on a column header, e.g. "Image" to sort the entries by the values in that column.

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[/os/windows/network/monitoring/resmon] permanent link

Sat, Jan 21, 2017 11:33 pm

Error occurred message when upgrading freeSSHd

I needed to upgrade freeSSHd, which is free Secure Shell (SSH) server software for Microsoft Windows systems, on a Windows 8 system. The software allows remote users to log into a command line interface on the Windows system via SSH and provides the capability to transfer files via the SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP). When I attempted to install the latest version of the software over a prior version, however, the installation was unsuccessful. If you see the following error message, you may need to stop the SSHD service prior to performing the upgrade:

An error occurred while trying to replace the existing file:
DeleteFile failed; code 5.
Access is denied.

Click Retry to try again, Ignore to skip this file (not recommended), or Abort to cancel installation.

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[/os/windows/network/ssh/freeSSHd] permanent link

Sat, Mar 19, 2016 10:51 pm

Determining which program is listening on a port under Windows

If you want to know which application is listening on a particular network port on a Microsoft Windows system, e.g., port 80, the port used for HTTP connections to a web server, you can obtain that information from a command line interface (CLI) by obtaining a command prompt and using the netstat and tasklist commands which are provided with the operating system; you do not need to install any additional software, though there are programs that will allow you to view that information from a graphical user interface (GUI).

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[/os/windows/network] permanent link

Mon, Feb 29, 2016 11:07 pm

Using SSH Keys with PuTTY

PuTTY is a free and open source network utility that allows you to establish Telnet and Secure Shell (SSH) connections to servers. It is commonly used on Microsoft Windows systms, but is also available for Linux and Apple OS X systems. You can use it for interactive SSH logins where you provide a userid and password to authenticate with an SSH server, but you can also use it for public key-based logins where the server has a public key that is matched against a private key stored on the system from which you are connecting. By a mathematical calculation based on large prime numbers, the public key and private key can be matched with one another as a means of authenticating the login.

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[/os/windows/network/ssh/putty] permanent link

Sun, Feb 14, 2016 1:40 pm

Determining if a Windows system supports the 5 GHz Wifi band

The Wi-Fi network adapter in a Microsoft Windows system may support dual band wireless connections, i.e, both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands for a wireless local area network (WLAN), or it may only only support the older 2.4 GHz standard. A radio frequency (RF) band is is a group of frequencies containing many channels. To determine if a wireless adapter can support both the 2.4 and 5 GhZ Wifi standards, you can obtain a command prompt and type the command netsh wlan show drivers. If you see 802.11a listed on the "Radio types supported line, then the adapter supports the 5 GHz as well as the 2.4 GHz bands.

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[/os/windows/network] permanent link

Sun, Feb 07, 2016 8:04 pm

Changing the appearance of a PuTTY session

If you wish to be able to easily distinguish Secure Shell (SSH) sessions to a particular server when using PuTTY, a free and open-source SSH and Telnet client application available for Microsoft Windows, OS X, and Linux systems, you can change the background color used for connections to a particular server through PuTTY's "Change Settings" option, which will allow you to change the background and foreground colors (the foreground color is used for text). Colors are specified by RGB value.

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[/os/windows/network/ssh/putty] permanent link

Fri, Jun 12, 2015 10:12 pm

Port forwarding with PuTTY

The free PuTTY program for Microsoft Windows systems allows you to establish SSH connections. The program includes port forwarding capability, so that you can forward connectivity to a port on the system running PuTTY to a port on the SSH server to which you have connected using PuTTY or even another system accessible from the SSH server. E.g., suppose you can remotely connect to a SSH server at your home or business, but you can't access a web server at home or at the business location remotely. One option you can use is have PuTTY "listen" on the system on which it runs on a port, e.g., port 8888, and for any connection to that port on the local system on which PuTTY is running, forward the connection to the remote web server through the SSH server as explained at Port forwarding to another device with PuTTY. Such port forwarding can be performed to any TCP port.

Alternatively, you can set up a SOCKS proxy using PuTTY as noted at Using PuTTY to set up a SOCKS Proxy Connection. Instructions for configuring some browsers ito use a SOCKS proxy are provided from the links below:

[/os/windows/network/ssh/putty] permanent link

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